Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root: What’s The Difference Between Dicot Root And Monocot Root?

What's the difference between a dicot root and a monocot root? Read on to learn more about the difference between dicot and monocot plants, and the pros and cons of each type of root system.
Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root: 8 Key Differences, Pros & Cons, Examples

Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root: all the vascular plants have been divided into dicots and monocots based on the number of cotyledons present in them. Both of these types have their own unique rot system: dicot root and monocot root. Both of these roots encourage the plant and provide minerals and water. But if we look at the monocot vs. Dicot root difference, both have differences in their structure and number of tissues these contain.

Let’s take a closer look at Dicot vs. Monocot Root

Passage CellsAre only present in monocot roots
Secondary GrowthTakes place in dicot roots
CortexMonocot roots have a wider cortex region than dicot
Xylem VesselsDicot has regular xylem vessels while monocot has oval or rounded

Table of Contents

What Is Dicot Root?

What Is Dicot Root? A dicot root is basically a taproot which is a single thick root with smaller lateral branches. Din dicot root, the vascular bundles are present in the middle of the root and around the vascular cambium. Xylem and phloem are these vascular bundles that play some important roles. Xylem absorbs and carries the water from the roots to the leaves of the plant, while phloem, on the other hand, carries organic compounds, sugar, and other substances from leaves to the root and stem. In the dicot root, the xylem and phloem are separated by vascular cambium, which is the secondary growth of the dicot root.

A dicot root is basically a taproot which is a single thick root with smaller lateral branches. Din dicot root, the vascular bundles are present in the middle of the root and around the vascular cambium. Xylem and phloem are these vascular bundles that play some important roles. Xylem absorbs and carries the water from the roots to the leaves of the plant, while phloem, on the other hand, carries organic compounds, sugar, and other substances from leaves to the root and stem. In the dicot root, the xylem and phloem are separated by vascular cambium, which is the secondary growth of the dicot root.

What Is Monocot Root?

What Is Monocot Root? Monocot root is a fibrous root with many thin roots that originate from the stem and make a wide network. These tin roots are mostly found close to the surface of the soil. Monocot roots are covered with hairs that help in absorbing water and nutrients from the soil. Moreover, if we look at the structure of monocot root, the epidermis is its uppermost layer. After that, there is the cortex. Sclerenchyma cells are present within the cortex. Moreover, the endodermis of the monocot root separates the cortex from the central part of the root. Furthermore, a pith is also present in the central part of the monocot root.

Monocot root is a fibrous root with many thin roots that originate from the stem and make a wide network. These tin roots are mostly found close to the surface of the soil. Monocot roots are covered with hairs that help in absorbing water and nutrients from the soil. Moreover, if we look at the structure of monocot root, the epidermis is its uppermost layer. After that, there is the cortex. Sclerenchyma cells are present within the cortex. Moreover, the endodermis of the monocot root separates the cortex from the central part of the root. Furthermore, a pith is also present in the central part of the monocot root.

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8 Key Differences Between Dicot Root and Monocot Root

ComponentsDicot RootMonocot Root
DefinitionDicot root refers to the taproots which consist of a single primary root, in which secondary and tertiary roots grow downward.Monocot root refers to the root with the wide networks of thin roots and root fibers that originate from the stem.
Vascular TissuesA higher number of vascular tissues(xylem and phloem ) is present within the dicot root.Monocot root only contains a limited number of the xylem and phloem.
Conjunctive TissuesThe conjunctive tissues in dicot roots are known as parenchyma.Conjunctive tissues in monocot root are known as sclerenchyma.
PericycleIn dicot roots, cork cambium, vascular cambium, and lateral roots rise from the pericycle.The pericycle of the monocot root can only give rise to the lateral roots.
EpiblemaThe epiblema to dicot is thin-walled and without any color and cellular space. The stomata and cuticles are absent in the outermost layer of the dicot.The outermost layer or epiblema of monocot root is made up of parenchymatous cells without any intercellular space. It also has epidermal root hairs.
EndodermisThe endodermis root is less thick than the monocot root, with prominent Casparian strips.Monocot root has highly thick endodermis, and the Casparian strips are not visible.
CortexThe cortex of the dicot has thin walls and is made up of circular or polygonal parenchymatous cells. It also has intercellular spaces.The cortex of monocot root is made up of multilayers of parenchymatous cells. The intercellular space in the kit helps gas exchange and starch storage.
Xylem and PhloemXylem and phloem bundles in dicot root vary from 3-8.The number of xylem and phloem in monocot root can be between 8-46.

Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root Similarities

  • Both monocot root and dicot root are root systems of plants with the major function of absorbing minerals and water.
  • Both of these grow underground and provide support to the plant.
  • Both have root hair, pith, phloem, cortex, and endodermis in their main structure.
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Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root Examples

Examples of Plants with Dicot Root

  • Roses
  • Hollyhocks
  • Magnolias
  • Geraniums

Example of plants with Monocot Root

  • Bananas
  • Lilies
  • Sugarcane
  • Orchids
  • pineapples

Dicot Root vs. Monocot Root Pros and Cons

Dicot Root Pros and Cons

Dicot Root Pros and Cons

Pros of Dicot Root

  • The large surface area of dicot root makes it easier for root hairs to absorb water through osmosis.
  • The central vacuoles present in the dicot root allow them to collect all the minerals and water, which are further passed into the roots.

Cons of Dicot Root

  • The settles of the dicot root do not contain pith.
  • If we compare monocot vs. dicot root, the dicot root has a very narrow cortex.

Monocot Root Pros and Cons

Monocot Root Pros and Cons

Pros of Monocot Root

  • Monocot root plays a function as other roots in transporting the mineral and water to the plant.
  • Monocot root also takes part in giving the legitimate port to some parts of the plant.

Cons of Monocot Root

  • Secondary growth does not take place in the monocot root
  • Stomata and  passage cells are also absent in the monocot root

Comparison Chart

What's the difference between a dicot root and a monocot root? Read on to learn more about the difference between dicot and monocot plants, and the pros and cons of each type of root system.

Comparison Video

Monocots vs Dicots

Conclusion

Roots are the part of the plant which plays an important role In its development. Dicot or monocot roots both provide anchorage to the plant and transport water and nutrients. But if we talk about dicot Vs. monocot root, both are different in many ways. The main difference between a dicot and a monocot root is that dicot is a single thick root with small branches that grow deep into the soil. On the other hand, the monocot root consists of a network of many thin roots that can be found on the surface of the soil. Plants with monocot roots don’t need more water because their roots can absorb nutrients from deep in the soil. While the dicot roots further developed secondary and tertiary roots, which go deep into the soil to absorb nutrients.

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